Ford GT Supercar

In creating the all-new high-performance Ford GT, the pioneers behind the supercar designed it not only to win races but also to serve as a test bed for new technologies and ideas for future vehicles across Ford’s vehicle lineup.

Lessons learned from its production led to the innovative use of high-strength aluminum alloy in today’s Ford F-Series pickup trucks and the all-new Ford Expedition full-size SUV – shedding hundreds of pounds of weight, while also improving capability, performance and fuel efficiency.

GT’s aerodynamics change on demand to meet varying driving conditions, thanks to moveable elements around the body, including special ducts in the front, and a large deployable wing. The flaps open and close depending on whether GT’s wing is up or down, so the car remains aerodynamically balanced from front to back at all speeds.

Even the engine helps GT’s aerodynamics. The compact six-cylinder design of the car’s EcoBoost engine allowed the team to taper its fuselage to more efficient dimensions than a larger V8 would have allowed. In addition, the low placement of the engine’s turbochargers and outboard placement of the turbo intercoolers ahead of the rear wheels help to taper the fuselage around the engine.

Carbon fiber is an important new element that helps GT deliver both weight savings and sleek body shapes in ways not possible with steel or aluminum. For example, GT’s iconic flying buttresses that extend from the roof to the rear fenders wouldn’t be possible in steel or aluminum because of the limitations of conventional metal stamping.

Ford GT’s 3.5-liter EcoBoost engine is the company’s most powerful EcoBoost ever, delivering 647 horsepower. It was developed alongside the GT race engine and the 3.5-liter EcoBoost engine used in the F-150 Raptor high-performance off-road pickup, which shares almost 60 percent of its parts with GT’s engine.

The GT’s weight saving hydraulic suspension system lowers the supercar from normal mode into track mode – a 50 millimeter or nearly 2-inch difference the driver can see and feel. Track mode raises the wing and closes the front splitter ducts for optimal downforce for spirited, closed-course driving.

“When we began work on the all-new Ford GT in 2013, the team had three goals,” said Raj Nair, Ford executive vice president of Product Development and chief technical officer. “The first was to use it as a training ground for our engineers as we develop future engine technology and stretch our understanding of aerodynamics. Then, to push the boundaries of advanced material usage, such as lightweight carbon fiber. Finally, we set out to win the Le Mans 24 Hours, referred to by many as the ultimate test of endurance and efficiency.”

 

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