2018 Honda CB1000R

Honda‘s leading sport naked model has been reborn with the introduction of a minimalist but aggressively styled 2018 CB1000R. Unveiled at the EICMA motorcycle show, the model is a production version of the Neo-Sports Café Concept showcased at the recent Tokyo Motor Show. Following an early-2018 European release, the new CB1000R will be available in the U.S. in summer of next year.

The 2018 CB1000R’s styling takes a bold, distinct new direction that deliberately separates it from the naked-bike mainstream. Every aesthetic detail has been finessed for a dramatically updated overall design, with a powerful stance and an elevated performance package.

Only six exterior parts are constructed from plastic, the largest being the svelte front mudguard. By contrast, what really makes its presence felt is the use of premium metal finishes throughout, drawing on the long café-racer tradition—parts such as the burnished-aluminum radiator shroud and airbox cover; machined engine cases, cylinder head, and sprocket hub; and flangeless steel fuel tank.

The 998 DOHC four-cylinder engine—which shares its architecture and layout with the previous-generation CBR1000RR super sport bike—has been reworked to provide healthy increases in power and torque. Bore and stroke remain 75mm x 56.5mm, but compression ratio is up 0.4 to 11.6:1 and the pistons are now forged (rather than cast), as with the CBR1000RR SP.

“The CB1000R has always represented high performance in a naked four-cylinder machine, and while we knew that retaining that approach was important, we also felt it was time to take the platform in a new direction,” said Lee Edmunds, American Honda’s Manager of Motorcycle Marketing Communications.

“Increasingly, customer expectations walk a line between high-end performance and character, so it’s vital that there be a strong, emotional connection between rider and machine. With the new approach of the 2018 CB1000R, customers will experience increased pride in ownership while also benefiting from greatly improved handling and engine performance.”

 

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